Hey I Like your Afro


Mhark
January 7, 2010, 6:45 am
Filed under: Friends | Tags: , , , , ,

Mhark: “Who am I?”

Me: confused….

Mhark: “Coco Rocha!”

Still confused? Go here.

Ciao!



What I’ve been up to lately…
December 23, 2009, 2:48 am
Filed under: Mitzi's view | Tags: , , ,

I know I haven’t been around in a while but it’s for good reason. I’ve been busy taking pictures for my good friend Stephen Pham’s blog. Check it out here! Under normal circumstances, I would never consider myself a “street photographer” and I still don’t think I’m very good but at least you guys can get a feel for how cool Stephen is. Oh yeah, and how beautiful Vancouver is. ENJOY!

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Hey I like your… White wig
July 6, 2009, 6:33 am
Filed under: Mitzi's view | Tags: , , , ,

My best friends from the Arctic came to visit me in Vancouver and my friend Emily bought an awesome white bob wig to wear at a music festival she’s heading to in a few weeks. Emily in her white wig


Trying on wigs photo by Mitzi Figueroa
Linda wearing the white wig



I want you back MJ; Vigil hosted in downtown Vancouver
June 27, 2009, 8:27 am
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,
MJ memorial downtown Vancouver, Photo by Mitzi Figueroa

MJ memorial downtown Vancouver, Photo by Mitzi Figueroa

I was listening to P.Y.T. on my ipod just as I was making my way past the Art Gallery in downtown Vancouver on my way home from work. There were a few candles burning for the King of Pop and people began filing onto the steps of the building as familiar tunes from Thriller album blared over loud speakers. It was small but it was beautiful.

MJ vigil. Photo by Mitzi Figueroa

MJ vigil. Photo by Mitzi Figueroa

MJ Vigil. Photo by Mitzi Figueroa

MJ Vigil. Photo by Mitzi Figueroa



Stumbling into a silent outrage
June 18, 2009, 8:35 am
Filed under: Political | Tags: , , , , , ,
Protesters outside the Vancouver Art Gallery in response to the Iranian election

Protesters outside the Vancouver Art Gallery in response to the Iranian elections

I was walking home from work tonight when I literally walked into nearly 500 people were gathered in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery, holding candles, dressed in black and waving peace signs over their heads. I had unknowingly stumbled into a silent protest organized by University of British Columbia students, in response to the Iranian election results and the violent uprising that has killed at least seven people and injured hundreds more since Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was named president.

The crowd, made up of mostly Iranian members of the community, was part two of a seven-day-long protest planned to take place every night from 9:30 to 10:30 leading up to the final event scheduled to take place on Sunday. Organizers of the event planed the gathering to coordinate with a global silent protest similar to events scheduled in various cities including Toronto, New York City, and San Francisco.

After my initial surprise, I took some time to talk to some of the participants. Tarjee is a Canadian citizen who grew up in Tehran but moved to Vancouver nearly 8 years ago. She completed her undergraduate degree in Tehran and was heartbroken to watch the violent attacks on the University students living at the same university she attended.

Nearly 500 people gathered at the Vancouver Art Gallery in response to the Iranian election

“It’s been so hard for me every day. Every day I go to my lab and work like nothing happened. Some of my co-workers don’t pay attention to the news and we don’t talk about it. Every day I want to scream and fight but I don’t. I walked those streets, I went to that University, I’ve seen those rooms.”

The first thing she asked me when we began talking, was if I had seen the Youtube videos. She was referring to the hundreds of the video clips that have been uploaded to the free streaming site since the violence in Iran broke out seven days ago. Since all foreign press have been blocked from making any kind of reports on the current situation, citizens have taken it upon themselves to provide the rest of the world with an accurate account of what is happening. Despite the Iranian government’s attempt to silence the news, thousands of first hand accounts have made their way around to media outlets thanks to twitter updates, yotube videos and blog posts.

I asked Tarjee if she was attending the event tonight in protest of the outcome of the elections. Like so many thousands of Iranians, Tarjee is outraged and shocked at the election results and is convinced that election fraud was the culprit that led to a 66% majority vote to re-elect Ahmadinejad.

“I don’t see how Ahmadinejad could have won. But I am here tonight to show my support of the students. Right now they feel like they are freaks all alone fighting for Iran. But they are not. We are here with them.”

Organizers are expecting more supporters to come out on the final night of the week-long protest, scheduled to take place on Sunday.

Protesters outside the Vancouver Art Gallery in response to the Iranian election

Protesters outside the Vancouver Art Gallery in response to the Iranian election

The view outside the Vancouver Art Gallery. All photos by Mitzi Figueroa

The view outside the Vancouver Art Gallery. All photos by Mitzi Figueroa

Stay tuned for more updates on protests taking place in Vancouver throughout the week.



Vancouver, the most liveable city in the world
June 10, 2009, 1:05 am
Filed under: Mitzi's view | Tags: , , ,

Vancouver, the most beautiful city in the world

Vancouver, the most beautiful city in the world

Vancouver recently took first prize as the most “liveable city in the world” according to a new ranking done by the Economist Intelligence Unit. The study ranked each city with a score from 0-100 based on evaluation in five categories: stability, healthcare, culture and environment, education, and infrastructure. Vancouver was given a score of 98, closely followed by Vienna who came second place with a score of 97.9. The top ranked American city in “livability report” was Pittsburg who came in at 29th place.

As a newcomer to this fine city, I was rather proud that the top prize not only went to a Canadian city but that it also went to one of the most beautiful and lively cities I’ve ever experience. I’m extremely proud to call this city home and I’m looking forward to getting to know the alleys and backstreets that make this city so dynamic. Care to join?